What Happens If I Own Property in Tennessee and Die Without a Will?

When a person dies intestate (without a valid will stating to whom the decedent’s property is to be distributed) in Tennessee,  property can be divided multiple ways depending on the number and types of heirs-at-law, the type of property ownership involved, and whether the decedent has any valid debts. Many factors are involved which is why it is essential to understand your intestacy rights under Tennessee law when a spouse, parent, or other family member dies without a valid will.

The Importance of Estate Planning for Young Adults: What Parents Need to Know About the Law and a Child’s Eighteenth Birthday

Decorating a dorm room, rushing a fraternity or sorority, choosing a major, experiencing independence from parents, joining the workforce, taking a year off to decide what comes next – just a few things young adults can encounter after graduating from high school. Estate planning, however, is not usually on a young adult’s radar, but this is exactly when one should make sure some parts of the estate planning process are in order.

Surviving Spouse Elective Share Rights in Tennessee

Under Tennessee statutory law, a surviving spouse may take an “elective share” of the deceased spouse’s estate in lieu of what has been provided for him or her in the will or through the laws of intestacy. This law provides a mechanism for protecting the rights of surviving spouses who may not have received what they consider a fair share of the decedent’s estate. For individuals concerned about having their wishes altered by such an election, several estate planning tools remain available to minimize the risks associated with the elective share.

Spendthrift Trusts: Protecting the Beneficiary

There is an ever-present concern for providing the next generation with the right tools for success. While parents do their best to impart their own financial wisdom upon their children, some individuals require extra help. In terms of estate planning, this concern creates an additional need that is separate from personal asset protection and instead focuses on implementing strategies that protect intended beneficiaries from themselves.

Validity of Prenuptial Agreement in Question with Regard to Alan Thicke’s Estate

Following the December 2016 death of “Growing Pains” actor, Alan Thicke, tensions have risen between his loved ones concerning his estate, and the validity of a 2005 prenuptial agreement with his third wife. In a petition filed in May in Los Angeles County Superior Court, Thicke’s sons, Robin and Brennan, requested guidance regarding distributing their father’s trust property and the legitimacy of any potential claims from his widow, Tanya Callau Thicke, about the prenuptial agreement. Callau Thicke recently responded through a reported filing in early July. It seems that the legal battle is just getting started.